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The word “surrender” does not exist in Tukiman’s dictionary. Although he has been constrained by a physical disability since childhood, his spirit to live and work like everyone else has never dampened.

“My situation has always been like this from the very beginning, but I do not want to be pitied like others.

“Because of my condition, I was unable to get a job like everyone else. From there, I formed the intention to open my own workshop,” Tukiman says.

Armed with mechanical skills he acquired from a training course, Tukiman bravely ventured to open the “Man Service” motorcycle workshop in Gabung Makmur Village, Kerinci Kanan District, Siak Regency in Indonesia.

Tukiman, who was born in Banyuwangi, set up his workshop about 20 years ago, right after he decided to migrate to Riau to take part in the transmigration program launched by the government.

At the moment, 61-year-old Tukiman is assisted by his son in running his workshop.

“My daily activities comprise me repairing engines, welding, patching tires and setting rims. Despite my condition, there’s nothing about a motorcycle that I can’t fix,” he says.

Siak was initially a very quiet area. However, the development of various industries in the regency has led to an increase in motorcycle users in the area. Concurrently, Tukiman’s workshop has become an important facility for the surrounding community.

“Along with the development of Siak, my workshop regularly carries out motorcycle servicing, ranging from light services such as oil changes to heavier ones such as engine unloading,” Tukiman says.

Tukiman shares that there are at least four to five motorcycle users who come to Man Service to repair their motorbikes. At the workshop, Tukiman earns about Rp1 million per day.

“The workshop is able to achieve a gross income of Rp30 million per month. Of course, the money is rerouted back for the sake of the workshop’s future,” he continues.

However, there are many sad stories of Tukiman’s experiences in running the workshop, from being looked down upon by people to being cheated by customers.

“They (Man Service customers) initially said they would make the payments later. But up till now, they have not paid for the services provided. I can’t do anything except to wait for them to be aware,” Tukiman says.



RAPP’s Support

The development of Tukiman’s workshop is inseparable from the assistance provided by PT Riau Andalan Pulp and Paper (RAPP). Tukiman receives as much as Rp5 million in funding per period (between 10 and 12 months). The assistance is given to all small and medium enterprises (SMEs) located within the RAPP’s operational area, as part of the company’s community development program.

Tukiman uses the funds to buy things that are required in the workshop, such as tools and spare parts which are quite expensive. Previously, Man Service would often lack spare parts, but this no longer happens. Tukiman is even able to keep a stock should there be a sudden need, or to fulfill requests from other workshops.

“Due to RAPP’s generosity, I now have many tools and equipment in my workshop. The total amount of funding I’ve received since 2015 is now at Rp 15 million,” Tukiman says.

His efforts have resulted in him being able to buy the house that he uses as his workshop.

“Before this, I was using the space on a contract basis. Alhamdulillah, I have managed to afford it,” Tukiman says.

Tukiman believes that all that he’s achieved to date is a product of his hard work.

“The key is discipline, that’s it. Discipline, honesty, hard work. There will always be a way out,” Tukiman concludes.

Besides Tukiman’s, there are currently 73 businesses who receive funding from RAPP, which are spread over five regencies: Pelalawan, Siak Meranti, Kuansing, and Kampar. 32 out of these businesses are workshops.

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