Media

Latest news, updates and information on APRIL Group

As a big paper company, Riau Andalan Pulp or Paper (RAPP) is among the ideal companies for many jobseekers in Indonesia. This includes second generation employees of RAPP - young employees who are also given the opportunity join the company, just like their parents.

Kumparan.com recently had the opportunity to speak with three second-gen RAPP employees: Muhammad Ingga Satria (25), Rommy Endrawan (24), and Eny Chairany (33).

Although they are the children of RAPP employees, all three still had to undergo a competitive selection process for their jobs, like all other prospective employees.

“I was actually an intern at the company at first, where I was supposed to complete a two-month internship. However, because the RAPP employees considered my contribution during the internship to be valuable, it was extended until the end of the school term,” said Eny, who is currently working as a Corporate Visit Coordinator.

As children of RAPP employees, the three were already familiar with the company and the facilities provided to employee, since their childhoods. All three initially thought they would move elsewhere to work when they grew up, but they made the decision to contribute to this company based in Pangkalan Kerinci in Riau instead.

“I’m not sure why but most of my relatives on my mother’s side joined the police force. As the first grandson in the family, I was also expected to become a policeman but I guess I wasn’t destined to be one. I did focused on becoming one but failed in the final assessment stage, so I ended up going to university to continue my studies,” said Rommy, who currently works in RAPP’s Application Department.

Meanwhile, Muhammad Ingga, who is involved in running RAPP’s Distributed Control System (DCS) was able to pursue a degree at the Pulp and Paper Technology Academy in Bandung, with a scholarship from RAPP.

“When I was in high school and taking part in the Math Olympiad, my teacher told me to try applying for a scholarship to go to Bandung and Alhamdullilah, I was successful,” he said.

Carrying out assigned tasks while maintaining the good name of their parents has certainly not been easy, they said. All three have experienced being overshadowed at times by their parents who are long time employees of RAPP.

“But I don’t feel bad – rather, I feel quite proud if my parents outshine me.

“I think you have to be highly committed to join RAPP – if you’re not worthy, you wouldn’t even get the job. It doesn’t matter whose child you are. It’s all about fairness here, and if you’re considered not up to the task, you’ll be replaced with someone more suitable,” Rommy said.

Being entrusted by RAPP motivates the three to improve their performance and to innovate, to prove themselves as competent employees, and not just be seen as “the children of employees”.

“I think continuous improvement is mandatory. If there is no active effort to improve, no success can be achieved since you’ll either be stagnant or fail rather quickly. Every day, when there’s an issue that is resolved, I think about how to improve on resolving similar issues in the future,” Eny said.

The second-gen employees also expressed their hopes for the company.

“We hope that it continues to be a company which ensures the welfare of its employees and nearby residents, and to continue producing things which benefits the community as well as the environment,” Ingga said.

This article was produced in cooperation with PT Riau Andalan Pulp and Paper.